Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Rio Gozo Garlic Mojo- Bueno Para Gozar

When you have this much garlic you make Mojo.

At garlic harvest we start roasting, braiding, and piling it up all over the kitchen table. Garlic is best stored in a dark place, but the beauty of garlic is even if you leave it on the front porch, not a critter will touch it.

Fresh garlic is a stronger than garlic from the shelf at a grocery store. My first real garlic experience was at the outdoor Mercado in Granada, Spain. A little homesick and determined to make Mexican food (if you've ever had mexican food in Spain you can bet it's better in Mexico or at the Farmer and the Cook), I made a guacamole. I added the usual bit of chopped raw garlic and holy mole!, my mouth was on fire, the guacamole was ruined. My back up plan- Tortilla Español for dinner.

Garlic is perfect for roasting. You can use up your garlic in one dinner by baking it whole, un-peeled in oil and serving it with crostini as an appetizer. Or save it up and make this jar of garlic goodness to serve all week. Stores in the refrigerator for 3 months.
This recipe belongs to Chef Rick Bayless from PBS show One Plate at a Time.

Slow Roasted Garlic Mojo

Mojo de Ajo

Makes about 3 cups mojo de ajo (made with 2 cups of oil)

Recipe from Season 7 Mexico - One Plate at a Time


4 large heads garlic
OR 10 ounces (about 1 3/4 cups) peeled garlic cloves
2 or 3 cups fruity olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup fresh lime juice


Heat the oven to 325 degrees. Break the heads of garlic apart, then mash each clove (a fist against the side of a knife is what I do) to release the clove from its papery skin; if using already-peeled garlic, scoop the cloves into a heavy plastic bag and use a rolling pin to mash them slightly.

Stir together the garlic, oil and salt in an 8x8-inch baking pan (make sure all the garlic is submerged), slide it into the oven and bake until the garlic is soft and lightly brown, about 45 to 55 minutes.

Add the lime juice and return to the oven for 20 minutes for the garlic to absorb the lime and turn golden brown. (If you’re using the larger quantity of oil, ladle off 1 cup—no garlic cloves—and store it in a cool dry place for use in salad dressing or sautéing.)

Using an old-fashioned potato masher or large fork, mash the garlic into a coarse puree. Pour the mixture into a wide-mouth storage container and refrigerate it until you’re ready to enjoy some deliciousness. The mojo will last for up to three months as long as the garlic stays submerged under the oil.

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Community Supported Agriculture

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There is plenty of gozo at Rio Gozo Farm. That is JOY in Spanish and joy is one of the most dependable products we have. Gozo is commonly found in gardens and farms. Once you get a little gozo up and going it is very tolerant of most pests, withstands dry periods, and grows with a modicum of fertilizer. After gozo becomes a staple of one's diet, it goes with about anything. Actually folks crave it so much it is a wonder everyone does not have a patch of it growing close at hand. Grab up some gozo and get with the flow.