Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Purslane (Edible Weeds)

Edible weeds.  We like the lemony taste. Purslane is highly nutritious and grows prolifically. So here it is.

Purslane Recipes
Here's a great looking recipe for Purslane from Epicurious.com.  Check out recipes on our  Epicurious link in the side bar when you don't know what to do for dinner.

Purslane and Parsley Salad

Gourmet  | August 2008
by Ian Knauer

yield: Makes 6 servings
active time: 30 min
total time: 30 min
You might run across purslane, with its glossy, plump leaves, at a farmers market—and you might even find it growing in the cracks of your sidewalk or in your yard. Luckily, this incredibly nutritious and juicy green is a weed, which means it pops up wild nearly everywhere. Lots of chopped parsley and a simple vinaigrette flatter its herbal, lemony crunch. hide ›
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  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallot
  • 1/2 pound cherry tomatoes (preferably assorted heirloom varieties), halved or quartered if large
  • 6 cups packed tender purslane sprigs and leaves (from a 1-pound bunch)
  • 4 cups packed flat-leaf parsley leaves (from 2 large bunches)


Whisk together oil, lemon juice, shallot, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a large bowl.
Add tomatoes, purslane, and parsley, gently tossing to coat.
Cooks' note:Herbs and greens can be washed and dried 1 day ahead, then chilled in sealed plastic bags lined with paper towels. Toss with tomatoes and vinaigrette just before serving.

Or Try

Chopped Arabic Salad

Gourmet  | May 2004
Chopped Arabic Salad
yield: Makes 4 to 6 side-dish servings
This salad is wonderfully refreshing even without purslane, but if you can find the green at your produce market, it's worth using for the nice... more ›
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  • 1 lemon
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 (1/2-lb) cucumbers, peeled, halved lengthwise, seeded, and cut into 1/4-inch dice (2 1/3 cups)
  • 1 lb tomatoes (3 medium), cut into 1/3-inch dice (2 1/2 cups)
  • 1 cup finely chopped red onion (1 small) or 1 cup chopped scallions (about 5)
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped purslane (optional)
  • 1 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (from 1 large bunch)
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh mint (from 1 bunch)


Cut peel, including all white pith, from lemon with a sharp paring knife. Working over a bowl, cut segments from half of lemon free from membranes and transfer segments to a cutting board, then squeeze juice from membranes and remaining 1/2 lemon into bowl. Transfer 2 tablespoons juice to a large bowl, then finely chop segments and add to measured juice. Add salt, pepper, and oil, whisking to combine, then stir in remaining ingredients.

Here's some helpful info on Purslane found on Wikipedia

Culinary usage

A Purslane cultivar grown as a vegetable
Although purslane is considered a weed in the United States, it can be eaten as a leaf vegetable. It has a slightly sour and salty taste and is eaten throughout much of EuropeAsia and Mexico.[3][1] The stems, leaves and flower buds are all good to eat. Purslane can be used fresh as a saladstir-fried, or cooked like spinach, and because of itsmucilaginous quality it is also suitable for soups and stewsAustralian Aborigines used to use the seeds to makeseedcakes.
Purslane contains more Omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic acid in particular[4]) than any other leafy vegetable plant. Simopoulos states that Purslane has .01 mg/g of Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). This is an extraordinary amount of EPA for land based vegetable sources. EPA is an Omega-3 fatty acid normally found mostly in fish, some algae and flax seeds. [5] It also contains vitamins (mainly vitamin Avitamin C, and some vitamin B and carotenoids), as well asdietary minerals, such as magnesiumcalciumpotassium and iron. Also present are two types of betalain alkaloid pigments, the reddish betacyanins (visible in the coloration of the stems) and the yellow betaxanthins (noticeable in the flowers and in the slight yellowish cast of the leaves). Both of these pigment types are potent antioxidants and have been found to have antimutagenic properties in laboratory studies.[6]
100 grams of fresh purslane leaves (about 1 cup) contain 300 to 400 mg of alpha-linolenic acid [7]. One cup of cooked leaves contains 90 mg of calcium, 561 mg of potassium, and more than 2,000 IUs of vitamin A.

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