Friday, April 24, 2009

Sprouting something new at Rio Gozo Farm

There's new Gozo at the farm this spring. Farmers Steve Sprinkel and John Fonteyn have decided to expand the current CSA program to Ventura. Now we all know that Ventura (meaning "good fortune") is a short 11 miles distance from Ojai's nest. We've got three new acres tilled and planted just for Venturans, and we nesters have good reason to believe that folks down that way will like fresh, organic produce grown in our shared watershed. Indeed, this is good fortune for all. More details coming soon about summer subscriptions and Ventura drop locations.

Check out our latest addition to the blog- streaming photos of the farm on Flickr.

3 comments:

Maureen Durkin said...

I love love love your CSA ! All the fresh veggies are great and makes me explore and find new recipes. Thanks for having a drop-off in Ventura, it was the deal maker for us.

Here's a new favorite in our house...
Chocolate Zucchini Cake
2 ½ C Flour
1 ½ C Sugar
2 ½ t baking powder
1 ½ t baking soda
1 t cinnamon
1/4 t salt
2/3 C unsweetened cocoa
1/4 C oil
½ C unsweetened applesauce
3 eggs ( 3/4 C egg substitute)
2 t vanilla
½ C milk
2 ½ C grated zucchini, strained over colander to remove excess water
1 C chopped walnuts

·Preheat oven to 350◦ F.
·Combine dry ingredients in large bowl, making sure there are no lumps.
·Mix oil, applesauce, eggs, vanilla and milk in small bowl, whisk to combine.
·Add to wet ingredients to dry ingredients. Stir until moistened.
·Fold in zucchini and nuts.
·Pour into greased bundt pan and bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.

sethp said...

I am loving the new ventura drop off! The veggies are great but I don't know what half of them are. So here are a few links for anyone else who feels lost like me. Also I have a chart I created for myself with greens that are not covered in the 2 links below if anyone wants me to email them. The descriptions on each item also has a link to recipes...

Herbs:
http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/seasonalcooking/farmtotable/visualguidefreshherbs

Salad Green:
http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/seasonalcooking/farmtotable/visualguidesaladgreens

Michelle said...

Sethp,... thanks for the visual guide to the salad greens, perfect now I know what I'm eating!! I recognize a lot of them but like you I needed some help. Thanks.

Recipes

Apples (1) Arugula (3) arugula flowers (1) Avocado (2) Basil (9) Beet Greens (3) Beets (15) Bell Pepper (1) Blood Orange (2) Bok Choy (6) Bread (1) broccoli (3) Brussels Sprouts (2) Butternut Squash (4) Cabbage (11) Cantaloupe (1) Carrots (16) Cauliflower (1) Celeriac (3) Celery (6) Celery Root (1) Chard (14) Cherry Tomatoes (4) Chinese Broccoli (1) Chocolate Mint (1) Cilantro (7) clilantro (1) Coffee (1) Collard Rapini (1) Collards (3) Corn (1) CSA Information (8) CSA Memberships (1) Cucumber (8) Daikon (1) Dandelion (6) Dill (10) Edible Flowers (1) Eggplant (6) Eggs (1) Endive (1) Escarole (4) FAQ (1) Farro (1) Fennel (11) Frisée (1) Garlic (6) Garlic Scape (1) Gold Beets (1) Grapefruit (1) Green Garlic (2) Hakarai Turnip Greens (1) Hal (1) Haul (230) jalapeno (2) Jalapeños (2) Juicing (1) Juniper Berries (1) Kaboucha (1) Kale (15) Kohlrabi (2) Komatsuna (2) Lacinato Kale (1) Leafy Greens (1) Leeks (5) Lettuce (5) Mint (3) Mustard Greens (1) Nettles (2) Newsletter (2) Onion (6) Onions (1) Orange (1) oregano (1) Outstanding in the Field (1) Pak Choi (1) Parsley (3) Pea Shoots (1) pepper (6) Poblano (1) poetry (1) Pollen (1) Pomegranate (1) Potatoes (4) Preserved Lemons (1) Press (1) Pumpkin (4) Purslane (2) Radicchio (4) Radish (3) Rapini (1) Red Peppers (2) Romaine (1) Romaine Lettuce (1) Rutabaga (1) Sage (2) Salad dressing (1) Seder (1) Sorrel (1) Spinach (8) Spring Onions (2) Squash Blossoms (3) Stock (1) Strawberries (1) sugar beets (1) Summer squash (3) Sweet Pea Shoots (1) tangerines (1) Thanksgiving (1) Tomatillos (2) Tomato (10) Tomatoes (5) tricky (1) Turnip Greens (2) Turnips (13) Volunteer (1) Watermelon (1) Winter Squash (2) Zucchini (15)

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Community Supported Agriculture

Support Locally Grown Food

There is plenty of gozo at Rio Gozo Farm. That is JOY in Spanish and joy is one of the most dependable products we have. Gozo is commonly found in gardens and farms. Once you get a little gozo up and going it is very tolerant of most pests, withstands dry periods, and grows with a modicum of fertilizer. After gozo becomes a staple of one's diet, it goes with about anything. Actually folks crave it so much it is a wonder everyone does not have a patch of it growing close at hand. Grab up some gozo and get with the flow.